Cora Livingston Barton - Introduction

Cora Livingston Barton

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Introduction

Louise and Cora often spent the whole summer and much of the autumn at Montgomery Place and Edward joined them when his schedule allowed.

Prior to his retirement, Edward's political office lessened the amount of time he could spend with his wife and daughter at the estate. Cora, in an undated letter sent to her father circa 1830, wrote from Montgomery Place that she and her mother were happy “once more in the country. The pure air has quite exhilerated [sic] us after breathing the close atmosphere of the city.”

About the same time, Edward wrote a wistful letter to Louise at Montgomery Place. He told her that if an important political opportunity had not arisen, he would have been content “to walk all the summer through the walks you had planned, to see my daughter improving in health and spirits, now and then to plan a picnic, or plague myself in the vain effort to catch a trout.”    

Town and Country, by Jules Tavernier. Wood engraving on paper, 1873. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, USA, 1955.4204. Image © Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, USA.